Herman’s Hermits – There’s a kind of hush (video/audio edited & remastered) HQ02:37

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Published on June 27, 2016

“There’s a Kind of Hush” is a popular song written by Les Reed and Geoff Stephens which was a hit in 1967 for Herman’s Hermits and again in 1976 for The Carpenters.

The song was introduced on the 1966 album Winchester Cathedral by Geoff Stephens’ group the New Vaudeville Band; like that group’s hit “Winchester Cathedral”, “There’s a Kind of Hush” was conceived as a neo-British music hall number although it is a less overt proponent of that style. The first single version of “There’s a Kind of Hush” was recorded in 1966 by Gary and the Hornets, a teen/pre-teen male band from Franklin, Ohio whose version—entitled “A Kind of Hush” produced by Lou Reizner—became a regional success and showed signs of breaking nationally in January 1967; the single would reach No. 4 in Cincinnati and No. 3 in Erie PA. However an expedient cover by Herman’s Hermits was released in the US in February 1967 to reach the Top 30 of the Billboard Hot 100 in three weeks and proceed to a peak of #4—affording the group their final US Top Ten hit—with Gold certification for US sales of one million units awarded that April. In the UK Herman’s Hermits’ “There’s a Kind of Hush” would reach No. 7. The success of the Herman’s Hermits version led to the release of the original New Vaudeville Band track as a single in some territories with both of these versions charting in Australia with peaks of No. 5 (Herman’s Hermits) and No. 12 (New Vaudeville Band) and also in South Africa where the New Vaudeville Band bested the Herman’s Hermits’ No. 9 peak by reaching No. 4.

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