Corn Flake Kings: The Kellogg Brothers45:49

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Published on July 18, 2016

Kellogg

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Will Keith Kellogg,

generally referred to as W.K. Kellogg (April 7, 1860 – October 6, 1951), was an American industrialist in food manufacturing, best known as the founder of the Kellogg Company, which to this day produces a wide variety of popular breakfast cereals. He was a member of the Will_Keith_Kellogg_Seventh-day Adventist Church and practiced vegetarianism as a dietary principle taught by his church. Later, he founded the Kellogg Arabian Ranch and made it into a renowned establishment for the breeding of Arabian horses. Kellogg started the Kellogg Foundation in 1934 with $66 million in Kellogg company stock and investments, a donation that would be worth over a billion dollars in today’s economy. Kellogg continued to be a major philanthropist throughout his life.

John Harvey Kellogg, M.D

 (February 26, 1852 – December 14, 1943) was an American medical doctor in Battle Creek, Michigan, who ran a sanitarium using holistic methods, with a particular focus on nutrition, enemas, and exercise. Kellogg was an advocate of vegetarianism for health and is best known200px-John_Harvey_Kellogg_ggbain.15047 for the invention of the breakfast cereal known as corn flakes with his brother, Will Keith Kellogg.

He led in the establishment of the American Medical Missionary College. The College, founded in 1895, operated until 1910 when it merged with Illinois State University.

Kellogg’s

was founded as the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company on February 19, 1906, by Will Keith Kellogg as an outgrowth of his work with his brother John Harvey Kellogg at the Battle Creek Sanitarium following practices based on the Seventh-day Adventist Church. The company produced and marketed the hugely successful Kellogg’s Toasted Corn Flakes and was renamed the Kellogg Company in 1922.

In 1930, the Kellogg Company announced that most of its factories would shift towards 30-hour work weeks, from the usual 40. W.K. Kellogg stated that he did this so that an additional shift of workers would be employed in an effort to support people through the depression era. This practice remained until World War II, and continued briefly after the war, although some departments and factories remained locked into 30-hour work weeks until 1980.

From 1969 to 1977, Kellogg’s acquired various small businesses including Salada Foods, Fearn International, Mrs. Smith’s Pies, Eggo, and Pure Packed Foods; however, it was later criticized for not diversifying further like General Mills and Quaker Oats were. After underspending its competition in marketing and product Kelloggslogo600development, Kellogg’s U.S. market share hit a low 36.7% in 1983. A prominent Wall Street analyst called it “a fine company that’s past its prime” and the cereal market was being regarded as “mature”. Such comments invigorated Kellogg chairman William E. LaMothe to improve, which primarily involved approaching the demographic of 80 million baby boomers rather than marketing children-oriented cereals. In emphasizing cereal’s convenience and nutritional value, Kellogg’s helped persuade U.S. consumers age 25 to 49 to eat 26% more cereal than people of that age ate five years prior. The U.S. ready-to-eat cereal market, worth $3.7 billion at retail in 1983, totaled $5.4 billion by 1988, and had expanded three times as fast as the average grocery category. Kellogg’s also introduced new products including Crispix, Raisin Squares, and Nutri-Grain Biscuits and reached out internationally with Just Right aimed at Australians and Genmai Flakes for Japan. During this time, the company maintained success over its top competitors: General Mills, which largely marketed children’s cereals, and Post, which had difficulty in the adult cereal market.

In March 2001, Kellogg’s made its largest acquisition, the Keebler Company. Over the years, it has also gone on to acquire Morningstar Farms and Kashi divisions or subsidiaries. Kellogg’s also owns the Bear Naked, Natural Touch, Cheez-It, Murray, Austin cookies and crackers, Famous Amos, Gardenburger (acquired 2007), and Plantation brands. Presently, Kellogg’s is a member of the World Cocoa Foundation.

In 2012, Kellogg’s became the world’s second-largest snack food company (after PepsiCo) by acquiring the Pringles potato crisps brand from Procter & Gamble for $2.7 billion in a cash deal.

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